PhD

PhD                      

Le groupe de Recherche de Musicothérapie de University College of Arts (LUCA), campus Lemmensinstituut, Louvain, souhaite développer la musicothérapie comme moyen thérapeutique préverbal dans les domaines de la psychiatrie, de la gériatrie et des soins pour handicapés. Elle collabore dans ce but avec le Centre d’Expertise en Musicothérapie, issu de la collaboration entre le Lemmensinstituut avec le Centre Psychiatrique Universitaire de la K.U.Leuven, campus Kortenberg et l’Université Aalborg au Danemark.

C’est dans ce cadre que se situent les études de doctorat en musicothérapie.

L’information la plus récente sur la formation en question est disponible sur le site de l‘Université d’Aalborg, http://www.mt-phd.aau.dk/about.

On trouvera ci-dessous les résumés des sujets de recherche des musicothérapeutes belges ayant entrepris ou achevé un doctorat.

 

 

Recherches accomplies

Music and Psychosis.

The transition from sensorial play to musical form by psychotic patients in a music therapy process

Prof. Dr. Jos De Backer

The world from the psychotic patient often is unknown and unreachable. Via music not only an entrance to the baffling world from the psychotic patient can be found, but also ways can be developed to lend the disintegration and timelessness from the psychotic world a certain form and finiteness.

The presented research shows that music therapy with psychotic patients can contribute to the creation of a psychic space, which can be a possible onset to a process of symbolization. Essential hereby is the transformation in the course of the therapeutic process, form the sensorial play, via moments of synchronicity to an integrable experience, a musical form.

A more extended description from the research from Prof. Dr. Jos De Backer you can read following the link underneath:

Music and Psychosis. The transition from sensorial play to musical form by psychotic patients in a music therapy process.

 

 

Recherches en cours

Music Therapy and Dementia; the value of musical improvisation for the development of a therapeutic relationship in music therapy with people suffering from dementia.

Anke Coomans

coomans.anke@telenet.be

Qualifications: Music Therapist: MA (2002, Hogeschool voor Wetenschap & Kunst, campus Lemmensinstituut, Leuven, Belgium)

Current Position: PhD student at the Department of Music and Music Therapy (Aalborg University) since 1 Juli 2009

Music therapist at the UPC Sint Jozef, Kortenberg

Assistant teacher at the master training course for Music Therapy (Hogeschool voor Wetenschap & Kunst, campus Lemmensinstituut, Leuven).

Title of the PhD Study:

Music Therapy and Dementia; the value of musical improvisation for the development of a therapeutic relationship in music therapy with people suffering from dementia.

Supervisors:

Prof. Dr. Tony Wigram – Aalborg University, Denmark

Prof. Dr. Jos de Backer – UC Kortenberg/Hogeschool voor Wetenschap & Kunst, campus Lemmensinstituut

Prof. Dr. H.M. Ridder – Universiteit van Aalborg, Denemarken

Introduction:

Nowadays nobody doubts anymore that dementia is present in our society. In a ever aging population dementia indeed is a notion that gains more and more importance in our thinking about elderly and aging. The imaging concerning elderly now is not restricted anymore to considering the elder as a person who earns respect and has authority, but is coloured more and more by considering elderly as in need of care.

Prognoses concerning the incidence of dementia indicate that in 2030 the group of persons with dementia will take 2% from the total Belgian population. In 1990 this was only 1%. An important cause of this doubling is of course the ageing of our population. However, although age still is the most important risk factor, also young people are diagnosed with dementia.

Because of this dementia does not aim itself at one specific population group. It is not something of which you can say at a certain point: “I escaped this, this will not happen to me.”

The question to more research on this domain thrusts. Caretakers, to whom also music therapists belong, ask themselves how this question can be met and this at a level which is as humane as possible.

From the experience and from case studies reaching us via literature, we can assume that music therapy can contribute substantially to the approach of persons with dementia. By using music in the form of musical improvisations, the music therapist can come to meet the dementing person at a level where cognitive restrictions do not impede the contact. Especially the non-deficit side of being-demented comes forward, whereby the affect in its most pure, but also most uninjured form may be presented. The way the musical improvisation allows the therapist to witness this, is the intersubjective experience from the ‘coming-to-resonance’ where the inner psyche from the therapist resonates with that from the dementing person. Resonance then is one of the most important phenomenons considering the presented research.

Research questions:

Main research question:

What is the value of the musical improvisation for the development of a therapeutic relationship in the music therapy with persons with dementia?

Subquestions:

-What defines a therapeutic relationship in music therapy with persons with dementia?

-Which characteristics from a musical improvisation contribute to the development of a therapeutic relationship in the music therapy with persons with dementia?

-Which music therapeutic interventions are effective for the development of a therapeutic relationship in the music therapy with persons with dementia?

Design:

This study follows a qualitative multiple-case study design, whereby the researcher also is the music therapist conducting the sessions. The sessions will not differ from the usual sessions at the treatment unit from the involved subjects.

The subjects selected for the study, are all staying at a residential treatment unit specialized in dementia and find themselves in a moderate to severe stage of their illness. Four subjects are to be followed in the actual study.

The two most important data sources are the clinical notes from the sessions from the music therapist/ researcher on the one hand and on the other hand the video recordings from the clinical sessions.

For analysis of the data a research-intervision group is called together, consisting of an external music therapist, the researcher-music therapist, a psycho-therapist/psychiatrist and a musician. They will study the video recordings from the sessions, hereby focussing on the therapeutic relationship. Using categories, these data will be brought together and will be linked to the data from the clinical notes from the therapist and to the written analysis from the musical improvisations. On the basis of these data an answer will be formulated to the posed research question.

References:

-Evans, S. (2008). ‘Beyond forgetfulness’: how psychoanalytic ideas can help us to understand the experience of patients with dementia. In: Psychoanalytic psychotherapy, Vol. 22, No. 3, pp. 155-176.

-Foulkes, S.H., (1977). Notes on the Concept of Resonance. In: Foulkes, S.H. (1990). Selected Papers. London: Karnac, pp. 297-305.

-Hughes, J.C., Louw, S.J. & Sabat, S.R.,(2006). Dementia; mind meaning and the person. New York: Oxford University Press.

-Ridder, H.M.O. (2003) Singing Dialogue. Music Therapy with persons in advanced stages of dementia. A case study research design. Doctoraatsthesis, niet gepubliceerd. Aalborg: Aalborg University

-Wetenschappelijk Instituut Volksgezondheid (1998). Morbiditeiten: Actuele Toestand Dementie. Scientific Institute of Public Health. Found on 3 augustus, 2008, http://www.iph.fgov.be/epidemio/morbidat/nl/Zie/ZIEK13.htm

-Wheeler, B.L. (1995). Music therapy Research; Quantitative and qualitative perspectives. Phoenixville, Barcelona Publishers.

-Wheeler, B.L. (2005). Music therapy Research: Second Edition. Phoenixville, Barcelona Publishers

 


 

The musical improvisation within a music therapeutic context with people with a personality disorder.

Katrien Foubert

Supervisors: Jos De Backer / Rudi Vermote

From the experience in the music therapeutic practice it is known that the music therapist first of all needs to be a musician, because only then free improvisation as a form of art can obtain a therapeutic value. Mostly the receptive listening stance from the therapist, which we describe as ‘playing listening’, appears to be crucial in this. When the therapist unprejudiced, without interpretation, without memory, without desire, enters a play with the patient a musical and therapeutic space can be created. This way in which play, surprise, selflessness and the unprejudiced are standing in the front, touches the essence of art as well as therapy, writes Van Camp (2000a). It is a basic stance which we find by many great artists. But how can we better understand the musical forms that arise out of this ‘playing listening’ in a free improvisation within a music therapeutic context with people with a personality disorder? Research (De Backer 2008, Odell-Miller 2007, Schumacher et al. 2011), literature (Smeijsters 2005, Streeter 1999) and clinical experience show that there is a connection between the specific way in which a patient plays in a clinical improvisation and his/ het experience on a psychical level.
Drawing from a categorization of musical patterns that arise in the free improvisation and from the psychodynamic theory of Bion (1965, 1970) we try to get a better insight in the possible transformations that take place in a free musical improvisation.